Miles Beyond Miles
wizzy-prince:

cincer:


Everyone should give a second of there time to reblog this. Instead of reblog girls in crops tops. Just shows raw love.
peacecorps:

KEN-2006-D257 on Flickr.
Two youth in Kenya get ready for a soccer match.
peacecorps:


"Access to clean water is a human right and a necessity for good health." - Peace Corps Volunteer Nicholas Karr

Happy World Water Day!
In this photo, Peace Corps Volunteer Caitrin Martin and children from her Senegalese village celebrate the construction of a well to provide clean drinking water to their community.
wanderstruck:

Taken in Sabang, Morong, Bataan, Philippines during my final days as a Peace Corps Volunteer. 
peacecorps:


As a Small business development Volunteer in a rural village in Morocco, I worked with the local weaving association. One of my projects was creating a carpet catalog for the weavers. This took me into all the houses of the weavers where I photographed their carpets and family members. Here I photographed one of the weavers, Sadia, with a carpet made entirely of recycled sweater thread from her family. She had just finished it and her nephew, Mohamed, was excited about his modeling opportunity.

- Peace Corps Small Business Volunteer Terra Fuller
peacecorps:


This photo features a group of 5th graders at Waterberg Primary School in Namibia. It was taken November 10, 2009 shortly after the new computers arrived and the desks and painting had been completed. Along with teachers from my school, I solicited and created a relationship with a nearby local German NGO which ultimately donated 22 new computers to Waterberg Primary School, while the school fundraised for and built the tables and desks. The new computer lab that resulted was used by the school faculty and staff, students and surrounding village community and I held daily training courses for teachers, adults and students. When I left Waterberg, the Internet had not yet been set up, but my explanations and lessons for computer use had registered and made an impact, because 10 months after my departure from the school (and to this day), I received an email from my principal (and several from eager former students), I knew that the computer lab was being used and valued.

- Peace Corps Education Volunteer Melissa Becci
peacecorps:


Malaria is an incredibly deadly, pervasive disease. It kills between 750,000 to 1.2 million people every year, mostly children and pregnant women.
When you really see it at the local level, though, its real impact becomes clear. In my host family alone every single child had malaria last year at least once, some three or four times. It exacts an extraordinarily heavy toll on the health, productivity, and finances of the village, and nearly every family has lost children to the disease.
Prevention work can have incredibly positive effect on the well being of these families. Simple interventions like bed nets, indoor residual spraying and prompt treatment can save huge amounts of money, time and ultimately lives.

- Peace Corps Health Volunteer Ian Hennessee
peacecorps:

Peace Corps Business Volunteer Elisa Molina is working with her Costa Rican community to install and furnish a computer lab in the local elementary school. The lab will provide public computer and Internet access to members of her community and two neighboring villages. 
“The purpose of this project is to equip the classroom of an elementary school in a small rural community with computers and accompanying furniture. Generation after generation, students of this elementary school graduate without knowing how to use a computer and community members of a town of more than 600 people in the rural area currently have no public access to computers, word processing software, or the Internet.”